Western Kansas wheat crops are failing just when the world needs them most (2022)

LANE COUNTY, Kansas — This time of year, the wheat growing in this part of western Kansas should be thigh-high and lush green.

But as a months-long drought continues to parch the region, many fields tell a different story.

“There’s nothing out there. It’s dead,” farmer Vance Ehmke said, surveying a wheat field near his land in Lane County. “It’s just ankle-high straw.”

Across western Kansas, many fields planted with wheat months ago now look like barren wastelands. The gaping spaces between rows of brown, shriveled plants reveal hardened dirt that’s scarred with deep cracks from baking in the sun.

Of all the years for drought to hit western Kansas wheat farmers, it couldn’t have come at a worse time.

Even with wheat selling for near-record-high prices as the war in Ukraine disrupts the world’s food supplies, a lot of farmers in western Kansas won’t have any to sell. And those who made it through the drought with enough crop to harvest will likely end up with far fewer bushels than they had last year, a downturn that limits the state’s ability to help ease the global food crisis.

Western Kansas wheat crops are failing just when the world needs them most (1)

David Condos

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Kansas News Service

Wheat prices have bounced between $10 and $12 per bushel since setting an all-time record north of $13 in March. So it might stand to reason that farmers should be able to make up for poor harvests by selling the wheat they do have for more money.

But it’s not that simple.

The US Department of Agriculture estimates that wheat fields statewide will average roughly 39 bushels per acre this year, down sharply from 52 bushels per acre last year. But many farms in the western half of the state will produce far less than that.

USDA projections for Lane County say wheat farmers here will end up harvesting an average of 27 bushels per acre — less than half of what the county’s farmers averaged last year.

At $11 per bushel, each acre of that average Lane County farmer’s land would bring in just under $300 this season. In order to recoup the costs of doing business, Ehmke said farmers here need to gross closer to $325 per acre.

Ehmke considers himself fortunate. He expects his wheat to end up higher than that 27 bushel average, something he credits to the way he lets his land rest between plantings. But even with conservative land management strategies, his fields might still only produce half of what they did last year — all because of too much heat and not enough rain.

And he figures that at least half the wheat fields in western Kansas won’t produce enough for farmers to break even.

“They're losing money,” Ehmke said, “even with the highest price of wheat that we've probably ever seen in the past 50 or 100 years.”

Western Kansas wheat crops are failing just when the world needs them most (2)

David Condos

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Kansas News Service

Part of the problem is an increase in costs. Farmers face higher expenses across the board this season, largely thanks to supply chain issues caused by the war in Ukraine and sanctions against Russia.

The price of diesel — the fuel required to run the tractors and trucks that keep farms going — reached an all-time high last month and remains more than $5.50 per gallon.

(Video) Buy Flour While You Can! Western Kansas Wheat Crops Are Failing

Nitrogen fertilizer prices also soared to record levels this spring, peaking above $1,500 per ton — more than twice what it cost one year ago.

“It’ll be a very difficult year,” Rejeana Gvillo with Farmers Business Network said. “Just because commodity prices are high, it does not mean that producers are better off.”

Gvillo, a senior commodity analyst with the national agricultural data and e-commerce platform, traveled across the state last month to survey crop conditions during the annual Kansas wheat tour.

She said the differences between wheat stands in eastern and central Kansas — areas that should still see a decent harvest this year — and western Kansas were stark.

“Shorter crop. Uglier fields,” Gvillo said. “As we drove west, it just got way worse.”

Western Kansas wheat crops are failing just when the world needs them most (3)

Courtesy of Farmers Business Network

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In past years’ wheat tours, Gvillo said she would wear a rain suit to walk into wheat fields because she would get soaked with dew. This year, she didn’t see any morning moisture on plants until the tour neared Wichita.

Many stands were in such bad shape that she could easily step between scrawny rows of wheat without touching the plants at all. In some of the hardest-hit areas, she found seeds lying in the dirt that never got the chance to sprout.

“It was so dry, the grass on the side of the road was dead,” Gvillo said. “And that's weeds.”

Even some of the better-looking crops in western Kansas are so short — stunted by the heat and lack of moisture — that there’s concern about whether or not combines will be able to reach low enough to harvest them properly.

And with those high diesel costs, she said, it might not be financially feasible for some farmers to run a combine over their wheat — even if the crop could produce a few bushels per acre.

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Courtesy of Farmers Business Network

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Too little, too late

Kansas isn’t called the Wheat State for nothing. It produced nearly one quarter of all American wheat harvested last year.

But this year’s Kansas wheat crop has been through a lot of hardship since seeds went into the ground this past fall.

There was the Dec. 15 storm that battered the region with widespread wildfires, hurricane-force wind gusts and swirling clouds of dirt that zapped crops with static electricity and evoked images of the Dust Bowl.

Static electricity damage to wheat from dirt storm pic.twitter.com/cRmNpiGLd5

— Clay scott (@scottwestacre) December 16, 2021

This spring, extreme weather has continued to damage some wheat stands with hail, above-average winds and freezing temperatures.

Then there’s the months-long drought that continues to ring the region dry of what little moisture it has.

(Video) It's Happening - You Only Have Three Months

Every inch of western Kansas remains blanketed by some level of drought. Virtually all of southwest Kansas faces extreme or exceptional drought, the two most severe levels on the U.S. Drought Monitor’s scale. Some areas in the southwest corner of the state have been in extreme or exceptional drought since Christmas.

Even with some recent precipitation, much of western Kansas would still need an additional three to five inches of rain just to get back to its historical year-to-date average.

Most of the wheat stands in western Kansas are dryland, meaning they’re not irrigated. So growth depends on how much it happens to rain on that particular field.

But after months of wheat farmers hoping for rain, that window has closed.

“It’s basically too late for moisture to help,” Gvillo said. “In fact, water would probably hurt.”

That’s because rain would be more likely to increase the risk of disease or fungus than it would increase the yield at this late stage in the plant’s growth.

Western Kansas wheat crops are failing just when the world needs them most (5)

Courtesy of Farmers Business Network

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Marsha Boswell, vice president of communications with the Kansas Association of Wheat Growers, said the good news is that modern varieties of wheat seed have been bred to handle this dry climate.

“Wheat is one of the most drought-tolerant crops and one of the most resilient crops,” Boswell said. “But it does need just a little bit of help.”

The conditions this year have pushed those crops to the limit.

The US Department of Agriculture says 41% of Kansas wheat is in “very poor” or “poor” condition. That’s up from just 14% at this time last year.

The Wheat Quality Council estimates that more than one of every ten wheat fields in Kansas will be abandoned, meaning they didn’t grow enough crop to bother harvesting it. And that number is likely to creep up in the coming weeks.

“Abandonment is going to be a lot higher than an average year,” Boswell said. “There’s no way to harvest some of those acres where there’s just next to nothing left.”

Just finished up with our crop ins appraiser. Over half of our acres will not see a combine. Turns out CC wheat needs 10 lives with only 1” of precip pic.twitter.com/0eIIwe1jvC

— luke jaeger (@luke_jaeger) May 21, 2022

In other parts of the High Plains, the outlook is even more grim.

To the west in Colorado, projections say nearly one-third of wheat fields won’t produce enough to bother harvesting. In Texas, around three-quarters of the crop will likely be abandoned.

Daryl Strouts is president and CEO of the Kansas Wheat Alliance, which helps get new wheat varieties developed by Kansas State University out to farmers. If the state hadn’t already spent decades developing those drought-tolerant wheat breeds, he said, this year could have been much worse.

Kansas is still expected to harvest more than 250 million bushels of wheat this season. But that total will be down more than 100 million bushels from last year.

With record high wheat prices, that drop in production really adds up.

If you take those missing 100 million bushels and multiply them by the $11 per bushel that farmers could have potentially sold them for this year, it means the drought could cause the Kansas economy to miss out on more than one billion dollars.

“I'm always reminded of an old proverb,” Strouts said. “A farmer that has too much water has a lot of problems. A farmer that doesn't have enough water has only one.”

Western Kansas wheat crops are failing just when the world needs them most (6)

David Condos

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Kansas News Service

(Video) Record Heat, Hail, Crop Failure = GSM Much? - Bulusan Volcano - Sprites - Strawberry Super Moon

‘People will starve’

Now, global events have put even more pressure on Kansas wheat fields to produce food that millions of people around the world desperately need.

But even before this year’s drought, the total number of acres planted with wheat nationwide had been on a steady decline for decades as other crops like corn and soybeans became more profitable.

Two decades ago, the US produced one quarter of the world’s wheat exports. By last year, that number was down to just 13% as other countries took a larger share. Two of those counties were Russia and Ukraine, which have recently accounted for roughly one-third of the world’s wheat exports.

Now, Russia is blocking Ukraine from exporting some 20 million tons of wheat. And the war will likely prevent many Ukrainian farmers from harvesting or exporting this year’s crop.

Antonina Broyaka has seen how the Russian invasion has affected Ukraine’s communities and industries first-hand.

Until earlier this spring, she worked as dean of the agricultural economics department at the Vinnytsia National Agrarian University, just a few hours drive southwest of Kyiv. When Russia’s invasion began, she and her family fled to Kansas State University, where Broyaka studied nearly two decades ago.

She estimates that around 40% of Ukraine’s winter cropland has been lost because it’s become unsafe or is occupied by Russia.

Ukraine generally exports five to six million tons of grain per month. But most of that went out through Black Sea ports that are now blocked by Russia.

The country has still been able to export around one million tons of grain per month through rail and river transportation, Broyaka said, but that multimillion-ton deficit leaves a gaping void in the global food supply.

“Ukraine feeds around 400 million people in the world, so people will starve,” Broyaka said. “Some countries will need to replace that shortage.”

Western Kansas wheat crops are failing just when the world needs them most (7)

David Condos

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Kansas News Service

Another concern is Ukraine’s ability to store whatever grain its farmers are able to harvest this year.

Some of its large storage facilities have been destroyed by Russian bombings or left in occupied territory. Broyaka said many of the facilities that are accessible remain half-full with grain from the previous harvest that Ukraine hasn’t been able to export.

She’s also worried that Russia will continue to hold Ukraine’s wheat hostage in Black Sea ports as part of its political strategy. Russia could use that bargaining chip to blackmail nations that rely on Ukraine’s grain exports, pressuring them to support Russia’s military actions.

“That is a global problem,” Broyaka said, “and if the world will not help Ukraine to stop Russia, it will get worse.”

Recent reports warn that just 10 weeks’ worth of wheat remain in global stockpiles.

The U.S. exports more wheat than it imports, so the disruptions in Ukraine are unlikely to cause widespread food shortages here. But prices for wheat-based items like cereal and baked goods have already gone up.

For those living in countries that depend heavily on Ukrainian wheat, the consequences could be devastating. People in places like Egypt, Lebanon and Pakistan, for example, already face skyrocketing bread prices and shortages that put them at risk of going hungry.

On top of that, the world’s other leading wheat producers, India and China, have seen their crops damaged by blistering heat and overwhelming rains, respectively. Just last month, India sent wheat prices climbing yet again when officials stopped exporting the grain altogether because of worries about having enough for its domestic population.

(Video) MORE SUPPLY CHAIN ISSUES COULD BE COMING IN JULY STOCK UP NOW

Western Kansas wheat crops are failing just when the world needs them most (8)

David Condos

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Kansas News Service

Ernie Minton, dean of Kansas State University’s College of Agriculture, said the places most likely to be hurt by this shock to the food system are ones where millions of people already live on the edge of malnutrition.

“That is the really disturbing part,” Minton said. “The countries and the individuals that are impacted most are the ones that are least capable of shouldering that kind of shock.”

So how could the international community help? Building new grain storage infrastructure in Ukraine, Broyaka said, or investing in temporary plastic storage options — like the grain bags that K-State has been evaluating in parts of Africa — to increase Ukraine’s capacity in the short term.

Farming regions like Kansas could also help by exporting more grain. Roughly half of the wheat harvested in Kansas in a given year gets exported abroad, Minton said.

But increasing wheat production isn’t something that can happen overnight.

Here in Kansas, farmers planted their winter wheat last fall, months before Russia invaded Ukraine. So by the time global markets began feeling strained from the war, there wasn’t anything Kansas farmers could do to try to grow more, even if the rains would have allowed.

But, Minton said, that’s why K-State’s long-term research into developing new wheat varieties that can withstand future Kansas droughts is so vital.

“These are times when we really need to be cognizant of how fragile this global food issue is,” Minton said. “We all have to get involved and look for solutions, and there may not be easy ones in the short run.”

Furthermore, wheat is far from the only crop for which the world depends on both Ukraine and Kansas.

Ukraine is also one of the world’s largest corn exporters, accounting for roughly 17% of global exports. As planting time arrives for that spring grain, questions remain about how much Ukrainian farmers will be able to produce and export this year.

“Will Ukrainian farmers have access to the seeds? The fertilizer inputs? The fuel they need to run their equipment?,” Minton said. “That’s certainly a real concern.”

If drought continues in western Kansas, it is likely to limit the state’s ability to export its own corn to help make up for that deficit.

Western Kansas wheat crops are failing just when the world needs them most (9)

Courtesy of Farmers Business Network

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And even though this winter wheat season isn’t over yet, there are already concerns about next year.

Gvillo, the commodity analyst, said it would take superb harvests from all of the world’s major wheat producers to stabilize global supplies, and it doesn’t look like that’s going to happen this year. That would ratchet up the pressure on the 2023 wheat crop before it’s even planted.

And as the Kansas drought and Ukraine war drag on into uncertain futures, she said, global grain markets are likely to remain strained for months or even years.

“We’re not out of it yet,” Gvillo said. “I think this time next year, we’ll be having the same conversation.”

David Condos covers western Kansas for High Plains Public Radio and the Kansas News Service. You can follow him on Twitter @davidcondos.

The Kansas News Service is a collaboration of High Plains Public Radio, Kansas Public Radio, KCUR and KMUW focused on health, the social determinants of health and their connection to public policy.

(Video) Ukraine Update and Grain Market Update - September 2022

Kansas News Service stories and photos may be republished by news media at no cost with proper attribution and a link to ksnewsservice.org.
Copyright 2022 High Plains Public Radio. To see more, visit High Plains Public Radio.

FAQs

How does Kansas rank nationally in wheat production? ›

Kansas is the nation's leading wheat producer with records of wheat production predating statehood. Currently, Kansas is the world's best source for hard red winter wheat and is identifying new hard white varieties.

How much of the world's wheat is produced in Kansas? ›

1 in wheat production, according to the 2017 Census of Agriculture. Kansas farms produced 319 million bushels of wheat from 7 million harvested acres, accounting for almost 18 percent of all wheat grown in the United States. Kansas also ranked No.

Is the world almost out of wheat? ›

The estimates suggest 775 million metric tons (MMT) of wheat will be produced globally, which is only down 4 MMT from 2021.

What is the most important crop in Kansas? ›

Today approximately 90% of the land area of Kansas is devoted to agriculture production. Besides wheat,the most important crops in Kansas are corn, soybeans, grain sorghum (milo) and hay. A 2010 Kansas Farm Bureau report states that Kansas leads the nation in the production of both wheat and grain sorghum.

Can the US increase wheat production? ›

USDA expects that U.S. farmers may be able to increase production during the 2023 crop year and make up almost 50% of the level of wheat typically exported by Ukrainian farmers.” Ukraine exports are forecast at 19 million tonnes in 2021-22; exports were 16.85 million tonnes in 2020-21 and 21.02 million tonnes in 2019- ...

Where does the US get most of its wheat from? ›

Drivers
  • Mexico, the Philippines, Japan, and South Korea continue as consistent buyers of U.S. wheat, accounting for 41 percent of total U.S. wheat exports.
  • China was the largest growth market for U.S. wheat in 2020.

Does the US buy wheat from Russia? ›

Russia – US trade is based on massive natural resources

Wheat in particular is a big export market and Russian wheat accounts for around 17% of the global supply.

Who is the world's largest producer of wheat? ›

China is the world's largest wheat producer and has yielded more than 2.4 billion tonnes of wheat in the last 20 years, around 17% of total production.

What county in Kansas produces the most wheat? ›

In Kansas, the county that harvests the most wheat is Sumner County, Kansas. The other top 10 wheat-producing counties in Kansas are Mitchell, Saline, Dickinson, Rice, McPherson, Reno, Kingman, Harper and Sedgwick. There are six classes and more than 30,000 varieties of wheat.

What foods will be hard to get in 2022? ›

Meat shortages, especially beef and poultry, will plague us again in 2022. Daniels says that meat and poultry are in short supply in many supermarkets. This is due to several factors, with manufacturing plant labor shortages causing most of the issues.

Are we going to have a food shortage in 2022? ›

It looks like food shortages have continued into 2022. This is what might be causing the issue. After some signs of a slow and cautious return to pre-pandemic normalcy last year, 2022 is looking remarkably like fall 2020—and that means supply issues at grocery stores.

What foods will be affected by the wheat shortage? ›

So, wheat-based products like bread, flour, crackers, cereal, and baked goods will most likely continue to increase in price. Pasta prices, however, will not be impacted because pasta uses durum wheat and Ukraine isn't a major supplier of that wheat, says Laborde.

Is Kansas a good place to grow crops? ›

Kansas is a recognized leader in agriculture in the United States. Kansas is ranked first in grain sorghum production, growing almost 64% of the nation's crop. Kansas is ranked second in sorghum for silage production. Kansas leads the nation in winter wheat production, growing 24% of the nation's crop.

What is Kansas biggest crop export? ›

The state's largest manufacturing export category is transportation equipment, which accounted for $2.7 billion of Kansas's total goods exports in 2018.
...
Agriculture in Kansas depends on Exports.
2017 Value2017 State Rank
wheat$968 million2
soybeans$896 million10
beef and veal$891 million3
2 more rows

What state has the most farms? ›

Texas was by far the leading U.S. state in terms of total number of farms, with about 247 thousand farms by the end of 2021.

Why is US wheat production down? ›

The U.S. winter wheat harvest potential there has fallen by more than 25% due to severe drought. Kansas farmers may abandon thousands of acres of wheat in fields this year, instead of paying to harvest the drought-scorched grain. Back in North Dakota, it is too much water that is the problem.

Is the US planting more wheat in 2022? ›

The USDA has projected US wheat output in MY 2022-23 to increase to 1.8 billion bushels (48.5 million mt) against 1.6 billion bushels estimated for the previous year. The hard red spring wheat output is estimated at 457 million bushels, up 53.8% on the year from 297 million bushels in MY 2021-22.

Will wheat prices go up in 2022? ›

Consumers may face even higher wheat prices in the second half of 2022 as importers, who until now have supplied cargoes bought several months earlier at cheaper prices, pass on the costs from when wheat prices scaled decade highs in May.

Where does America buy wheat? ›

Indeed, in 18, the US imported 11.2 kmt of Wheat, rising by 44 & 382 kmt YoY in 19 and 20, respectively. The primary origin for US Wheat imports is Canada, representing ~ 81% of all US Wheat imports since 18, with 802 kmt.

What does US buy from Russia? ›

The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2019 were: mineral fuels ($13 billion), precious metal and stone (platinum) ($2.2 billion), iron and steel ($1.4 billion), fertilizers ($963 million), and inorganic chemicals ($763 million). U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Russia totaled $69 million in 2019.

Does the US import wheat from China? ›

The fastest growing export markets for Wheat of United States between 2019 and 2020 were China ($849M), Ethiopia ($121M), and Philippines ($89.6M). Imports In 2020, United States imported $448M in Wheat, becoming the 32nd largest importer of Wheat in the world.

Does the U.S. buy grain from Ukraine? ›

The United States is stepping up to buy about 150,000 metric tons of grain from Ukraine in the next few weeks for an upcoming shipment of food aid from ports no longer blockaded by war, the World Food Program chief has told The Associated Press.

Who buys wheat from Ukraine? ›

In 2020, Ukraine exported $4.61B in Wheat. The main destinations of Ukraine exports on Wheat were Egypt ($1.22B), Indonesia ($544M), Pakistan ($496M), Bangladesh ($295M), and Lebanon ($239M).

What food does the U.S. import from Ukraine? ›

U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Ukraine totaled $143 million in 2019. Leading categories include: fruit & vegetable juices ($48 million), other vegetable oils ($31 million), snack foods ($12 million), other dairy products ($2 million), and processed fruit & vegetables ($918 thousand).

Which country produces the best quality wheat? ›

The Top 10 Wheat Producing Countries
CountryProduction (Million Tons)
1. China130
2. India98
3. Russia63
4. USA58
6 more rows
18 Jun 2018

What is the best quality wheat? ›

Durum wheat, often known as pasta wheat or macaroni wheat, is grown in India. It is also one of the best quality wheat variety in India.

Who is the second largest producer of wheat in the world? ›

With a production reaching ten times in past five years, India is today the second largest wheat producer in the whole world.

Where is the wheat capital of the world? ›

Sumner County, Kansas > About Sumner County > County History > Farming in Sumner. Farming is the principal industry in Sumner County. Known as the "Wheat Capital of the World", the county regularly produces more wheat than any place on earth.

What state has the most wheat? ›

The state of Kansas leads the US in terms of wheat production, producing 333.6 million bushels in 2016. In fact, Kansas is sometimes referred to as "The Wheat State." There are about 60,000 farmers in Kansas, 20,000 of whom are wheat farmers.

Which variety of wheat is most common in Kansas? ›

SY Monument, the top-planted variety since 2019, accounts for 9.4% of the State's 2021 wheat planted acres. WB Grainfield ranks second at 5.5%. Zenda ranks third at 4.7%. The fourth most popular variety is T158 at 3.1%.

What to stock up on if there is a war? ›

From the Grocery Store
  • Bottled Water. This will probably be the first item gone from any store shelf if a crisis is either coming or hits. ...
  • Milk. This one should be a no-brainer. ...
  • Canned Meats & Food. Canned meats can be an excellent source of protein. ...
  • Jerky. ...
  • Rice. ...
  • Dried Beans. ...
  • Baby Supplies. ...
  • Dog Food.

What should I stock up on in case of food shortage? ›

Take a look at our recommendations below.
  • Protein. These food items are packed with protein and will keep for a long period of time. ...
  • Canned Goods. Canned goods are a favorite for stockpilers. ...
  • Beverages. Water is a no-brainer. ...
  • Flavorings. You may not think of these when stockpiling. ...
  • Fillers. ...
  • Something Sweet. ...
  • Miscellaneous.

What should I buy for food shortage? ›

Here's a list of what you should buy to prepare for a food shortage:
  • Flour.
  • Rice.
  • Noodles and Pasta (various varieties, white & wholewheat)
  • Vegetables (Freeze Dried, Canned, and Dehydrated)
  • Fruit (Freeze Dried, Canned, and Dehydrated)
  • Oats.

What should you stock up on now? ›

Here's what we're stocking up on right now:
  • Pasta! All shapes—linguine, fettuccine, spaghetti, penne, and rigatoni are our faves. ...
  • Other grains. ...
  • Canned goods. ...
  • Dry goods! ...
  • Eggs. ...
  • Dairy! ...
  • Fresh vegetables that last: cabbage, cauliflower, potatoes and sweet potatoes last and last, so we're loading up. ...
  • Frozen veggies.

Should we prepare for food shortage? ›

You should prepare for food storage to be ready for natural disasters, the next global pandemic, increased food prices, and future recessions. In addition, food storage is the best way to be self-sufficient for any emergency that results in food shortages and economic instability.

Will there be food shortages in 2023? ›

The food crisis could worsen in 2023, with a supply squeeze overtaking logistical constraints as the key challenge. The Ukraine war has disrupted sowing and other farm activities, which has affected yields. Elsewhere, farmers are using less fertilizers due to high prices, which could depress harvests.

What should I stock up for wheat shortage? ›

Grain Shortages: Stock Up now - How To Preserve It! - YouTube

What should I be stocking up on 2022? ›

If you are wondering what food to buy before inflation hits more, some of the best food items to stockpile include:
  • Peanut butter.
  • Pasta.
  • Canned tomatoes.
  • Baking goods – flour, sugar, yeast, etc.
  • Cooking oils.
  • Canned vegetables and fruits.
  • Applesauce.
12 Feb 2022

Why are Walmart shelves empty? ›

The lack harkens back to the earliest days of the COVID-19 pandemic, when everything from panic buying to global supply chain disruptions was blamed for empty store shelves. In a statement to CTV News on Friday, the company said the problem is primarily affecting its largest stores.

Can you still homestead in Kansas? ›

Kansas is one of the few states that has an unlimited homestead exemption. However, property values are affected by the maximum acreage limit in both urban and rural environments. If you're thinking of moving to Kansas to file for bankruptcy, think again.

Is Kansas a good place to Homestead? ›

The state has many attributes that might be attractive to new farmers and homesteaders, from moderate growing conditions to plentiful livestock and financial opportunities for new farmers.

How much is a acre in Kansas? ›

LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION: land values in Kansas range from $4,100/acre in the North East region to $1,175/acre in the South West region of the state. In more productive cropland and grazing land areas the value per acre is typically higher than lower producing areas with less annual rainfall.

What is Kansas main import? ›

Yearly Imports

In 2021 the top import origins of Kansas were China ($2.27B), Canada ($1.8B), Taiwan ($1.1B), Germany ($963M), and Mexico ($857M). In 2021 the top imports of Kansas were Commodities not specified according to kind ($1.26B), Other Aircraft parts ($437M), Turbo-jet engines of a thrust >...

What are the most common jobs in Kansas? ›

Detailed List Of The Most Common Jobs In Kansas City, KS
RankJob TitleCount
1Cashier1,308
2Sales Associate803
3Customer Service Representative617
4Certified Nursing Assistant556
88 more rows
24 May 2022

What Kansas is known for? ›

What is Kansas Known For? Kansas is known for its vast prairies, rolling hills, and natural beauty. The state has one of the most miles of river than any other state in the Great Plains and is home to the world's largest contiguous tallgrass prairie.

What state has best soil? ›

Iowa. Iowa has some of the richest and most productive of soils in the world. Around 90 percent of its land being used for agriculture, the state ranks second in the nation for agricultural production, after California. The Tama soils of Iowa occur in 28 Iowa counties as well as in parts of other, neighboring states.

Who is the richest farmer in America? ›

Harry Stine (America)

He has a net worth of $3.5 billion. Stine made this huge fortune by licensing corn and soybean genetics to big multinational companies like Monsanto and Syngenta. Stine, the son of a farmer, was fascinated by seeds when he was growing up at their family farm.

What is the best state to farm in? ›

Kentucky, Oklahoma and North Dakota ranked as the best states to start farms in 2021, according to a study by LawnStarter. At the other end of the spectrum Alaska, Maine and Connecticut were ranked as 50th, 49th, and 48th respectively as states that are relatively less enticing to start a farm or ranch.

Who is the world's largest producer of wheat? ›

China is the world's largest wheat producer and has yielded more than 2.4 billion tonnes of wheat in the last 20 years, around 17% of total production.

What is Kansas ranked in terms of livestock production? ›

Kansas ranks third nationally in cattle production, with $8.4 billion across the state as of Jan. 1, 2021. That's a little over 6.5 million head of cattle.

Which county in Kansas produces the most wheat? ›

In Kansas, the county that harvests the most wheat is Sumner County, Kansas. The other top 10 wheat-producing counties in Kansas are Mitchell, Saline, Dickinson, Rice, McPherson, Reno, Kingman, Harper and Sedgwick. There are six classes and more than 30,000 varieties of wheat.

How much is a acre in Kansas? ›

LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION: land values in Kansas range from $4,100/acre in the North East region to $1,175/acre in the South West region of the state. In more productive cropland and grazing land areas the value per acre is typically higher than lower producing areas with less annual rainfall.

What is Kansas biggest crop export? ›

The state's largest manufacturing export category is transportation equipment, which accounted for $2.7 billion of Kansas's total goods exports in 2018.
...
Agriculture in Kansas depends on Exports.
2017 Value2017 State Rank
wheat$968 million2
soybeans$896 million10
beef and veal$891 million3
2 more rows

What state has the most farms? ›

Texas was by far the leading U.S. state in terms of total number of farms, with about 247 thousand farms by the end of 2021.

Which country produces the best quality wheat? ›

The Top 10 Wheat Producing Countries
CountryProduction (Million Tons)
1. China130
2. India98
3. Russia63
4. USA58
6 more rows
18 Jun 2018

What is the best quality wheat? ›

Durum wheat, often known as pasta wheat or macaroni wheat, is grown in India. It is also one of the best quality wheat variety in India.

Who buys Ukrainian wheat? ›

“USAID is providing the funds to the World Food Program, a United Nations agency that historically gets the biggest part of its grain from Ukraine, to purchase, ship and store up to 150,000 metric tons of wheat, the agency said.

Who owns the most cattle in the US? ›

Texas has the most cattle in the United States followed by Nebraska & Kansas. Texas has the most cattle in the United States followed by Nebraska & Kansas. Texas accounts for roughly 13% of the cattle inventory in the United States.

What US state has the most cows? ›

Texas remains the state with the most total cattle, followed by Nebraska, Kansas, California, Oklahoma and Missouri.

What variety of wheat is grown in Kansas? ›

Everest Continues to be the Top Kansas Wheat Variety

WB Cedar dropped from fourth to fifth with 4.5 percent. TAM 112 came in sixth with 4.2 percent, whereas Gallagher, a newcomer to the top ten, jumped to seventh with 3.3 percent. LCS Mint more than tripled its 2015 percentage share to come in eighth at 3.2 percent.

Where is the wheat capital of the world? ›

Sumner County, Kansas > About Sumner County > County History > Farming in Sumner. Farming is the principal industry in Sumner County. Known as the "Wheat Capital of the World", the county regularly produces more wheat than any place on earth.

What state has the most wheat? ›

The state of Kansas leads the US in terms of wheat production, producing 333.6 million bushels in 2016. In fact, Kansas is sometimes referred to as "The Wheat State." There are about 60,000 farmers in Kansas, 20,000 of whom are wheat farmers.

Which variety of wheat is most common in Kansas? ›

SY Monument, the top-planted variety since 2019, accounts for 9.4% of the State's 2021 wheat planted acres. WB Grainfield ranks second at 5.5%. Zenda ranks third at 4.7%. The fourth most popular variety is T158 at 3.1%.

Videos

1. North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Summary and Outlook
(National Integrated Drought Information System)
2. The Challenges Facing South Dakota's Wheat Crop - Reid Christopherson
(Market to Market)
3. Why Farmers Are Destroying Millions Of Pounds Of Food
(CNBC)
4. The Apocalyptic Global Food Crisis That We Were Told To Prepare For Has Already Started In 2022
(Epic Economist)
5. This is VERY BAD and NO ONE is Talking About It
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6. 1192 – Reaction to the Findings from the Hard Winter Wheat Tour … An Economic Analysis of a...
(Agriculture Today - Kansas State University)

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